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Population Cohorts

Population Cohorts

Race and Ethnicity

  • In the 2010 Census, Non-Hispanic Whites still comprised the largest number of people in the region, but their share of the population is steadily decreasing, down from 68% in 1990 to 55% in 2010.
  • The African-American share of the total population has decreased from 9% in 1990 to 7% in 2010.
  • Asians have more than doubled their share since 1990.

Race and Ethnicity

Hispanic Age Groups

  • Hispanics, all races, represent the largest “minority” population (31% of the total population in 2010). The Hispanic population grew by more than 64% between 2000 and 2010.
  • The under-18 population grew by 73% between 2000 and 2010, substantially more than projected (Texas State Data Center, Scenario 2.0), making it the largest Hispanic age cohort.

Hispanic Age Groups

Age Groups

  • While Central Texas certainly has the same “baby boomer” bubble as most urban areas and the nation, the region has a relatively higher proportion of the young workforce-aged population.

Age Groups

Youth by Race/Ethnicity

  • In recent years, the non-White youth population (individuals under 18 years of age) has been growing faster than the White youth population, far outpacing estimates.
  • The non-White cohort is primarily Hispanic.
  • This shift is reflected in increasing diversity within the public school system.

Youth by Race/Ethnicity

Elderly by Race/Ethnicity

  • In recent years, the White elderly population (individuals 65 years of age or older) has been growing dramatically faster than the non-White elderly population.
  • While not on the same scale as increases in the youth population, the services needed by a growing elderly population can demand greater resources.

Elderly by Race/Ethnicity

CONTEXT

The shifting patterns within our overall population – both by race/ethnicity as well as by age – illustrate that Central Texas continues to progress through a significant demographic shift, as are the state and the nation. This shift will affect not only how we manage the challenges of growth today, but also how we think about the future.

The trends in sub-groups or cohorts of the overall population – such as race and ethnicity, age, and income – are also important to track. Many regional or overall population trends are significantly different, both positive and negative, when disaggregated by population cohorts.